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Immigration & Deportation

We provide urgent legal services to reunify families and assist low-income immigrants in obtaining lawful status, applying for citizenship, and defending against deportation.

How To Get Help

For help with an immigration matter, whether for removal defense or for help with an affirmative immigration benefit (citizenship, green cards, family-based petitions, etc.), with concerns about public charge, or for help with advance planning for non-citizen parents, please call our Immigration Law Unit Helpline: 844-955-3425.

The helpline operates Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Detained Individuals

Immigrant New Yorkers detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) at the Bergen or Hudson County Jails in New Jersey or in Orange County Jail in New York, and/or their family members, may call for information about representation through the New York Immigrant Family Unit Project (NYIFUP), a collaboration between The Legal Aid Society, Brooklyn Defender Services, and The Bronx Defenders. Immigrants detained at other immigration detention facilities and in upstate New York prisons and/or their family members can call the hotline for advice only.

Detained individuals and/or their family members can contact the Detention Hotline at 212-577-3456 on Wednesdays from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Collect calls from detention facilities and prisons are accepted.

Important Things To Know

Do you or a family member have a current case in immigration court?

Learn More

If you need help applying for an immigration application, call our helpline at (844) 955-3425 (hours: Monday – Friday, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm)

Create an emergency plan to assist your loved ones in the case that you're detained or deported.

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Terms You Might Hear

The justice system can be overwhelming. Get familiar with some legal terms and acronyms you might hear like appeal, adjournment, petition, jurisdiction, deposition, and affidavit.

  • Attorney – A person admitted to practice law and authorized to perform criminal and civil legal functions on behalf of clients.
  • Bail – The temporary release of a prisoner in exchange for security given for the prisoner's appearance at a later hearing.
  • Conviction – A criminal proceeding that concludes the defendant is guilty of the charged crime.
  • Docket – A written list of judicial proceedings set down for trial in a court.
  • Foster Care – A system in which a child lives with and is cared for by people who are not the child's parents for a period of time.
  • Hearing – A legal proceeding where an issue of law or fact is tried and evidence is presented to help determine the issue.
  • ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement
  • Interpreter – A person sworn at a judicial proceeding to translate oral or written language.
  • Lawyer – Someone whose job is to give advice to people about the law and speak for them in court.
  • Lien – A claim on specific property for payment of a debt.
  • Order – An oral or written command or a direction from a judge.
  • Parole – Early release of a prisoner who is then subject to continued monitoring as well as compliance with certain terms and conditions for a specified period.
  • Petition – In special or summary proceedings, a paper like a document filed in court and delivered to the respondents, stating what the petitioner requests from the court and the respondents.
  • Proceeding – A type of lawsuit. In Housing Court, a nonpayment proceeding seeks past-due rent; a holdover proceeding seeks possession of the premises.
  • Public Charge – An immigration law that can be basis for denying a non-citizen entry in the U.S., or for denying an application to adjust status if they are applying through a family member.
  • USCIS – United States Citizen and Immigration Services
  • Waive – To voluntarily give up a right. Examples include not enforcing the terms of a contract, or knowingly giving up a legal right such as a speedy trial.
  • Warrant – An official document approved by an authority (normally a judge) which gives the police permission to do certain things.